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Egypt is strengthening its commitment to the Democratic Republic of the Congo by investing $6 million in the Central African country’s energy sector

The Egyptian government has plans to strengthen its current commitment to the Democratic Republic of Congo by investing $6 million in two solar power plants with the combined generation capacity of 2MW.

The Daily News Egypt reported last week that an anonymous government source revealed that the project will be funded by the Egyptian Fund for Technical Cooperation with Africa, and the Arab Organization for Industrialization (AOI) will establish it through direct order.

According to the source, this is the first type of transaction which the AOI has taken part in abroad, the Daily News Egypt reported.

The two solar power plants will be connected to a medium voltage line to provide electricity over a 24 hour period through energy storage batteries and electrical transformers, media reported.

The Entebbe Treaty

The Entebbe Treaty which is designed to replace The Nile Basin Initiative , was initiated by Ethiopia, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda and Kenya which states that projects could be built as long as they don’t significantly affect the water flow.

The unnamed government source commended the Congo’s position on the Entebbe Treaty, which it consolidated with Egypt and Sudan, the Daily News Egypt reported.

The Egyptian Fund for Technical Cooperation with Africa plays a key role in driving Egypt’s foreign policy towards Africa. According to media, the Egyptian Fund provides technical assistance to African countries as well as scholarships and trainings in various sectors.

The Nile Basin

In earlier reports, ESI Africa reported that both Egypt and Sudan have relied on the Nile Basin for water resources since a treaty was implemented in 1929 by Britain where the countries receive 55 billion cubic metres and Sudan receives 18.5 billion cubic metres a year respectively.

In 1999 The Nile Basin Initiative was established to create an agreement between other countries who were initially excluded off the 1929 agreements.

The Nile Basin Initiative has caused many issues due to Egypt’s and Sudan’s unwillingness to negotiate their share of the water and insistence on retaining veto rights.