hydroelectric power

hydroelectricScottish-based energy company SgurrEnergy  has received funding from the Scottish Government to innovate and implement a hydroelectric scheme in southern Malawi to supply renewable power to an off-grid community.

The three-year project includes the installation of a 100kW hydroelectric scheme in Mulanje Massif as well as a community education programme, driving skills development in operation and maintenance of renewable technology.

Involvement of local content

Sgurr will collaborate with local entities Mulanje Electricity Generation Authority, Practical Action and Mulanje Renewable Energy Agency to provide access to clean power for over 1,000 residents.

According to a company statement, the project will reduce Malawi’s dependency on importing expensive diesel generators which in turn will benefit local industry and schools. The local medical facility will be able to use refrigerators and sterilisers for the first time as well as offer medical care after the sun goes down.

Scotland’s Minister for Europe & International Development, Humza Yousaf, said: “Helping remote communities in Malawi to access energy is important for the future of the country. We might take electricity for granted but a reliable, cost effective and clean power source enables medics to treat patients safely and will help school students study after dark”.

“In addition, the skills and training of local people in Malawi will provide a legacy for the project far beyond just this one location. The project builds on the special relationship between Scotland and Malawi, making a real difference to people’s lives,” Yousaf concluded.

Malawi Renewable Energy Acceleration Programme

The Scottish government implemented the Malawi Renewable Energy Acceleration Programme with the goal of providing reliable energy access to marginalised communities in Malawi.

The acceleration programme will be run by the Strathclyde University and funded by the International Development Fund.

The Scottish Government said in a statement that “this innovative programme will build on a previous successful Community Rural Electrification and Development project between Scotland and Malawi led by Strathclyde University”.

“That project provided seven solar energy systems in schools and health posts, as well as in eight teachers’ houses. In one school, this allowed 180 students to continue their studies further into the evening, using solar powered lighting.  Community groups and village health workers also benefited from the new solar lighting systems.”

(Pic Credits: dailytech)