14 July 2009 – Legislation that the Senate passed in law by 154 votes in favour, one against and one abstention, re-launches nuclear in Italy. The objective of the government is to lay the foundation of a new station by the end of the current legislature.  

The objective is the construction of a 12,000 MW series of plants, with a stimulus investment of about 35 billion. The first concrete commitment comes from the EDF-Enel understanding, agreed last February, that covers the construction of four advanced third-generation stations of the EPR type of 1,600 MW each. The first will begin service in 2020.

The return of nuclear in Italy is a strategic opportunity for rebuilding the scientific, technological and industrial chain that is indispensible for stabilizing the costs of electrical energy generation, reducing the dependence of raw material imports and fighting climate change. The opportunity of nuclear is increased by the realisation that nuclear is indispensible for security of supply and competitive pricing, in relation to the environment.

Enel actually has a nuclear production capacity of 5860MW with more than 4,000 specialised workers in the sector and has reconstituted from outside a nuclear culture at the highest level. In Slovakia it has been engaged through Slovenske Elektrarne in the work of installation of Russian nuclear technology (installed capacity of 1840MW, with a production of 12.2 billion kWh per year) and the construction of two new further reactors of 880MW.

In Spain, with the acquisition of Endesa, one can count on 3,640MW installed, with the production of 26 billion kWh per year, using American technology.

In France, it is participating in the construction of the first EPR (1,600MW under construction in Flamanville) with a share of 12.5% of the investment and a notable commitment of human resources. At the moment, in fact, 60 Enel engineers and technicians are participating in the project. To complete the picture of Enel in nuclear, there is the doubling of the Cernavoda nuclear plant in Romania using Canadian technology and the accord signed with Rosatom for the joint development of new stations in Russia.