Washington DC, United States — ESI-AFRICA.COM — 12 May 2011 – Leaders of the renewable energy industry have hailed the report of the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which shows that with the right policies to support growth, renewable power sources could dominate the world’s energy supply by 2050.

The IPCC report called even more strongly for the development of smart energy policies to ensure that renewable energy continues to grow.

It says this momentous change away from fossil fuels could help keep the increase in global temperature below 2 degrees Celsius – an aim recognised in the United Nations Climate Convention’s Cancun Agreements.

“It is extremely heartening to see acknowledgement by the United Nations of something we have known for a long time: biomass and other renewable energy sources have the potential to produce significantly more energy than we are already producing,” said Bob Cleaves, president & CEO of the Biomass Power Association. “Not too long ago, it would have been unthinkable to forecast that energy from renewable sources would surpass energy from fossil fuels “’ and now it appears that this goal is within reach. The growth of the renewable energy industry will lead to a cleaner environment and to the creation of thousands of jobs.”

“This new report confirms we have to change how we think about renewable energy. Each of the renewable technologies will produce significant amounts of energy and together they will meet the majority of our energy needs in the future,” said Karl Gawell, executive director of the Geothermal Energy Association. “Now, we need to see national energy plans and policies like a strong national renewable energy standard and long-term incentives to accelerate this transition to a new, clean energy future."

“What the IPCC has found is something the renewable energy industry has known for some time: these technologies can power our future,” said Linda Church Ciocci, executive director of the National Hydropower Association.

“Once again, technical experts have concluded that renewable energy can and must be a major part of our energy supply,” says Denise Bode, CEO of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). “Already wind has installed 35% of all new electric generation capacity since 2007, and tracks ahead of schedule in supplying the U.S. with 20% of its generation from wind by 2030.”