Thin filmed solar PV
Total Nigeria Plc
TOTAL Nigeria has revealed that it plans to expand its solar-powered filling stations project by December this year. Pic credit: ngrguardiannews.com

TOTAL Nigeria has revealed plans to launch eight additional solar-powered filling stations across the country, while reaffirming its commitment to continue providing excellent service delivery to its customers.

The oil marketing firm launched its first solar-powered filling station in June 2014 at Ikeja, Lagos.

Managing Director Alex Vovk told local media, The Guardian that there are already ongoing works at the eight stations, which are expected to be commissioned by December this year.

“It is a great innovation and we are working to expand the network. By December this year we will be rolling out another eight solar powered filling stations across the country.”

Nigeria plans two big solar projects

In other Nigerian solar energy news, Dubai-based renewable energy power developer, Access Infra Africa in association with Nigerian Quaint Global Energy Solutions revealed their plans of constructing the 50MW ABIBA solar power plant.

The ABIBA plant is expected to power an estimated 600,000 households in Kaduna, in northern Nigeria.

According to Reuters the plant is scheduled to be built over the next two years and so far Quaint Global Energy has acquired a $1.3 million loan from the US Trade and Development Agency. Access Infra Africa will be providing 30% of the total $100 million needed for the project.

300MW PV solar power plant

In a separate statement, Shiroro Hydroelectric Power Station announced that it plans to construct a 300MW PV solar power plant once it get the approval from the Bureau of Public Enterprise (BPE) and the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission .

The company’s chief technical officer, Roland Lwiindi told local media, the Post that the new plant will be built within the premises of the existing Shiroro plant and its first phase could come on line by 2017.

He said: “We are going to write to BPE for permission to build a solar plant that will last for 20 years. It is either we continue to run it or the Federal Government buys it from us.

It will be the largest project in Africa and we will link the operation with hydro so that if anything happens to the hydro the solar picks up. The land is the technical issue that will mitigate us since we have the transmission infrastructure and the human resource is also there.”