hydroelectric power
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Low rainfall may pose a risk to Nigeria’s current hydro power generation.

In West Africa, the National Union of Electricity Employees (NUEE) have voiced concerns over Nigeria’s current improved power generation, claiming that it is not sustainable.

Joe Ajaero, the body’s general secretary said: “During this time of the year, there is always a slight improvement in power supply because of the rise in water level[s]. That is, the lake goes up and hydro power stations generate more power.”

Power generation: gas vandalism

Ajaero added that since President Buhari, who was elected earlier this year, has taken office, gas pipeline vandalism has been reduced, the Nigerian Bulletin reported.

Ajaero said that they suspect high level individuals of having a level of involvement in the corruption surrounding pipeline vandalism.

“If the pipelines are vandalised and the contracts are awarded for repairs, almost every two months, it is big money for them. I think […] because of the fear that those who [are] engaged in the business may be caught, […] there is relative peace and the gas pipelines are delivering gas to the power plants.”

Low rainfall could pose a threat

When the rainy season draws to a close, Ajaero expressed concern that the current power situation will not be able to sustain itself.

According to Ajaero, the country does not have any emergency reserves stored.

“Today, all power being generated is being pumped into the system, there is no reserve in case of any break down, and there is no reserve in case of maintenance and so on.”

Increased power generation

Late last month, the Transmission Company of Nigeria (TCN) said that the company had achieved a new peak of 4,748MW of generated power.

This was disclosed in a statement signed by the Managing Director, System/Market Operation of TCN, Dipak Sarma, This Day Live reported.

In addition, the Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission has increased its generation target to 6,000MW capacity by the end of December.