Dar es Salaam, Tanzania — ESI-AFRICA.COM — 18 October 2011 – In a bid to ensure substantial reductions of greenhouse gas emissions in the East African Community region, the European Union (EU) has awarded contracts to undertake two green energy development projects in Tanzania and Uganda.

According to an EU report published here, a sum of US$ 1.8 million will see the two projects “’ awarded to UK-based Camco International Limited “’ take off.

The EU says the first contract is for Camco to develop a US$1.0 million solar photovoltaic clusters project in Tanzania in which small-scale solar systems will be installed in 15,000 homes in Lake Victoria region over the next three years.

In terms of the second contract, Camco will provide technical assistance to the Belgian Development Agency to develop clean energy projects worth US$800,000 in Uganda.

Minister for energy and minerals William Ngeleja told East African Business Week that the solar photovoltaic clusters project was in line with the vision of the energy sector which aimed at effectively contributing to the growth of the national economy, and thereby improving the standard of living for the entire nation in a sustainable and environmentally sound manner.

He said that the energy policy in Tanzania recognised the importance of private sector participation in development of energy sector which was the engine of industrial investment in the country.

Ngeleja added that this project had come at a time when the Government was struggling to ensure sustainable and reliable power. “In the near future projects like this will untie the country from relying on unpredictable power sources,” he said.

Ambassador Tim Clarke, the Head of European Union Delegation to Tanzania said that Tanzania and the rest of the EAC region had to adopt solar power to light up their communities because it was reliable and cheap to install and maintain.

Camco president Yariv Cohen said his company would collaborate with manufacturers, project developers and technology providers in Uganda to use existing proven technology to develop clean energy projects that will lead to substantial reductions of greenhouse gas emissions.