The Algerian energy ministry has released a report documenting that the west African country has seen a 7.5% increase in domestic energy consumption over the past year.

This has largely been due to increased demand in gas processing industries, including Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) and petrochemicals industries, News Ghana reported.

Energy consumption

The ministry added that energy products such as gasoline and diesel have been largely affected by this growth.

In 2015, the market experienced a large jump in demand between January and September, which saw a 13.6% rise compared to 2014. The report recorded a “significant” increase for natural gas in the first nine months of 2015. This was as a result of increased consumption of power plants by 13% to 30 billion cubic meters.

Petroleum gains traction

[quote]During the same period, the report showed that the domestic market consumed over 13 million tonnes of petroleum with an increase of 5.7% due to increased demand on gasoline (+7.5%) and gas oil (+5.6%).

Despite the Algerian government postponing plans to explore shale gas reserves until 2022, News Ghana reported that it has earmarked $22 billion for the development of natural gas fields, as well as a $90 billion oil investment for the period 2015-2019.

Ghana News reported that oil and gas reserves in Algeria have increased by 5% from 4.2 billion tonnes in 2010 to 4.4 billion tonnes in 2014, official figures have indicated.

Shale gas

The plans for exploring shale gas were ground to a halt in January following protests after the government announced a $70 billion investment in shale gas technology.

ESI Africa reported at the time that disgruntled residents were concerned over the potential effects that this development could have on them claiming that the government is acting on this for their own benefit and not that of the surrounding community.

Algeria’s Prime Minister, Abdel Malek Sellal told media that the decision to halt shale gas developments could become a permanent one, the Middle East Eye reported.