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Residents that are served by the Mount Kigali substation are set to experience stable power supply following an upgrade of the facility.

According to the New Times, the substation was upgraded with two transformers of 20MVA each, replacing the old 10 MVA transformers, which could not cope with the demand during peak hours, sometimes leading to power outages.

Ron Weiss, the CEO of Rwanda Energy Group (REG), said there is a big improvement in terms of power loss reduction.

The upgrade forms part of the Grid Reduction Project, which targets to reduce annual power losses from 19.6%.

It is reported that the government is targeting to reduce power loses by 1% every year. Read more: Rwanda receives additional funding to improve electricity supply

The project has been supported by the European Union with a total of €23 million ($26 million) grant.

Speaking at the inauguration of the substation in Kigali, the Minister for Infrastructure, Claver Gatete, said: “We are now seeing improvement in the reliability of the power supplied in the city of Kigali.”

The substation supplies electricity in Nyamirambo in Kigali and in neighbouring districts of Bugesera, Kamonyi and big parts of Muhanga District.

The substation will be fully operational before the end of this week, Gatete said.

Improving power supply

Gatete noted that the energy sector continues to grow in electricity generation, transmission and distribution to ensure that the targeted universal access by 2024 is attained.

The East African country targets universal electricity access by 2024, from the current 46.4%, and to achieve this requires strong partnerships with different stakeholders, Gatete underlined.

The sector is also challenged by old infrastructure and overstretched network resulting into losses, hence disrupting the reliability of the power supply in the country, the minister said.

Also speaking at the event, Stefano Manservisi, the Director General of the European Commission for International Cooperation and Development: “Electricity is crucial and it is, therefore, the reason why we are investing a lot together with our member states and we are looking into how we can do better.

“I am very pleased to see this realisation because it allows a more regular supply of quality (electricity) particularly in this area because it is an area with high economic activity.”

In conclusion, Manservisi said: “The next step would be to consolidate, to help in the regulatory framework, and fostering private investment.”