Botswana's President Ian Khama speaks during meetings with US President Barack Obama in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, DC, November 5, 2009. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB
Botswana’s President Ian Khama has announced that government has engaged in talks with IPPs to mitigate power inefficiences Pic crdit: enca.com

In Botswana, President Lt Gen. Seretse Khama Ian Khama announced earlier this week that government is in the process of securing independent power producers (IPPs) to develop an additional 300MW by expanding Morupule B power station with units five and six.

While delivering the State-of-the-Nation address, Khama said transitioning Botswana from an energy dependent country to energy surplus nation was a priority, revealing that a further 300MW plant at a coalfield is to be determined to ensure power supply security, Botswana Daily News reports.

The president highlighted that although Morupule B power station is undergoing remedial works, the country’s energy supply has been supplemented by Orapa and Matshelagabedi diesel peaking plants.

IPPs develop renewable energy

Khama also noted that while Morupule A is being renovated, the Botswana government is in the process of introducing solar power plants through IPPs.

He said: “In light of our recent frustration with the poor delivery of the Morupule B and other projects, government is in the process of establishing a Project Management Office to oversee the implementation of major energy and water projects.

“This will be done through appropriate project management methodologies.”

President Khama also highlighted that there has been an increase in demand for energy due to the success of the National Electricity Access programme, which has resulted in 49, 897 additional households connected to the national grid since May.

The total number of electrified households now stood at 302, 436, Khama said.

Five landfill gas-to-energy power plants

In other Southern African energy generation news, a consortium led by a UK-based biogas specialist, ENER-G Systems, is to develop five landfill gas-to-power plants in Johannesburg, South Africa over the next three years.

The £11 million ($16.7 million) project is expected to produce a total of 13MW of energy and achieve equivalent carbon dioxide emissions savings of approximately 542,495 metric tonnes per year, Waste Management World reported this week.

The general manager of ENER-G Systems, David Cornish said the landfill gas generation is the first successful IPP project in South Africa carried under the Department of Energy’s Renewable Electricity Independent Power Procurement Program (REIPPP).

“This complex project has been seven years in development and we are very grateful to the City Council of Johannesburg,” Cornish said.

ENER-G explained that it is the majority shareholder in the project, alongside state-owned Central Energy Fund  Ltd, and Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment  company Secure Rock Enterprises.

The first 5MW facility is projected to begin operation at Robinson Deep by mid-2016.

The 3MW Goudkoppies facility is planned to open by late 2016. Plants at Marie Louise and Ennerdale will open in 2017, with the 1MW Linbro Park facility scheduled for completion in the middle of 2018.