Click here to download the APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION AS REGISTERED PERSON

Click here to download the APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL AS APPROVED INSPECTION AUTHORITY FOR ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

Click here to download the APPLICATION FOR DUPLICATE CERTIFICATE ISSUED IN TERMS OF THE ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION REGULATIONS, 2009

In 2013 ESI Africa published a story, written by Nick du Plessis, MD of P&T Technology, on obtaining a wireman’s licence. This story has been re-worked to include some new information and a link to the regulatory, practical and theoretical requirements needed for the various levels of certification.

Electrical industry workers and contractors must be adequately trained to ensure that electrical installations are produced safely. Workers must obtain a license and meet certain requirements before any electrical work is carried out.

“An electrician with a license, known as the Registered Person, has applied to the department of labour (DoL) and has demonstrated his knowledge, skills and ability to conduct verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of the electrical installations for which they have been registered. The Registered Person is permitted to issue a Certificate of Compliance (CoC), which proves that the electrical installation is compliant,” says du Plessis.

The Electrical Contractors Board has advised that registration as an Electrical Contractor to be equipped with a Wireman Licence must be done through the Department of Labour. Once the electrician has received his wireman licence, it has to be activated with the Department of Labour for a one year/three year period. Once the licence is activated, the electrician would be given a Registration Number by the Department. This registration number would allow a Contractor to purchase Certificates of Compliance. This document must be submitted as proof when purchasing electrical certificates.

There are three categories of registered people who are permitted to issue a CoC.

Category one:  Electrical tester for single phase

This is an electrician who has been registered as an electrical tester for single phase in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of electrical installations supplied by a single-phase electricity supply at the point of control, excluding specialised electrical installations.

Category two:  Installation electrician

This involves a registered person who is an electrician who has been registered as an installation electrician in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of any electrical installation, excluding specialised electrical installations.

Category three: Master installation electrician

The third category of registered person who is an electrician registered as a master installation electrician in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of any electrical installation.

Du Plessis says that for each of the registration types, there are three options – practical knowledge, theoretical knowledge and knowledge of statutory requirements – and each contains criteria or conditions that the applicant has to fulfil before applying for registration.

One criteria for a person applying for registration as an installation electrician is that he/she must have a trade qualification as either

  • an electrician;
  • an electrician (engineering);
  • an electrician (construction);
  • a millwright (electro-mechanical);
  • a lift mechanic;
  • or the Electric: Chemical Electrical NQF level 4 qualification issued by the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA).

Du Plessis stresses that the individual will not be accepted if he/she has any other trade.

The next step

The next step is to submit documentary proof of successful completed unit standards on inspection, testing and certification of three phase industrial/commercial installations as prescribed by the ESETA.

These unit standards mean that an assessor, registered with the ESETA, must assess applicants to establish that they have the ability to interpret the codes of practice in various electrical installations. The applicants would also have to use test instruments and inspection reports to show the assessor that they know how to use the test instruments and interpret the readings. The applicants would also have to correctly evaluate a CoC against an electrical installation.

Once the assessor has found the applicant to be competent, the details are sent to the ESETA, who will then issue the applicant with a letter for the DoL.

“The minimum theoretical qualifications needed by a person applying for registration as an installation electrician is an N3 certificate issued by the department of education, with minimum pass of 40% in each of the following subjects: mathematics, engineering science, and electrical trade theory or electro-technology. Also acceptable is a Grade 12 certificate with a minimum pass of 40% in mathematics, science, and technical – electrical or an equivalent subject that may include an N3 subject.”

Finally, the applicant will have to submit proof of knowledge of the legislation and relevant health and safety standards applicable to electrical installations by having passed the subject, Installation Rules, as administered by the department of education through an FET campus or college.

There are two examinations for this subject and the applicant must have a minimum of 50% for each paper. Although both papers do not have to be written at the same time, the second paper must be passed within 12 months of passing the first. However, if the applicant obtained more than 75% of 100 marks in any one of the examinations, he or she will be permanently exempted from rewriting that examination.

Du Plessis finally emphasises that having a wireman’s licence (registration) means that the electrician carries a great deal of responsibility and should he/she issue a Certificate of Compliance but have not done what is expected by law, the department of labour will prosecute the electrician.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:

Is it necessary for a “wireman’s licence” as issued by the department of labour to be renewed from time to time?
According to the Electric Contracting Board, the answer to this is no – however “the registered person should stay abreast of all the changes to sans10142-1, the electrical industry is forever changing and therefore the registered people need to stay on top of these changes.”

If i have a wireman’s licence and i’m not registered with the ecb, can i issue CoC’s?
No, as per regulation 6(1) and the definition “installation work” of the electrical installation regulations

***

Original story

9 October 2013 – Electricians often request information on how to obtain a wireman’s license as well as information on the unit standards involved in the process. Supplier of electrical training and development competencies to industries P&T Technology MD Nick Du Plessis explains the difference between an unlicensed electrician and an electrician with a wireman’s license.

“An electrician with a license, known as the Registered Person, has applied to the department of labour (DoL) and has demonstrated his knowledge, skills and ability to conduct verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of the electrical installations for which they have been registered. The Registered Person is permitted to issue a Certificate of Compliance (CoC), which proves that the electrical installation is compliant.”pt-technology-facility-injohannesburg

There are three categories of registered people who are permitted to issue a CoC.

Category one

An electrical tester for single phase, this being an electrician who has been registered as an electrical tester for single phase in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of electrical installations supplied by a single-phase electricity supply at the point of control, excluding specialised electrical installations.

Category two

This involves a registered person who is the installation electrician, this being an electrician who has been registered as an installation electrician in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of any electrical installation, excluding specialised electrical installations.

Category three

The third category of registered person is a master installation electrician, who is an electrician registered as a master installation electrician in terms of regulation 11 (2) for the verification and certification of the construction, testing and inspection of any electrical installation.

Du Plessis says that for each of the registration types, there are three options – practical knowledge, theoretical knowledge and knowledge of statutory requirements – and each contains criteria or conditions that the applicant has to fulfil before applying for registration.

“One criteria for a person applying for registration as an installation electrician is that he/she must have a trade qualification as either an electrician; an electrician (engineering); an electrician (construction); a millwright (electro-mechanical); a lift mechanic; or the Electric : Chemical Electrical NQF level 4 qualification issued by the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority (CHIETA).” He stresses that the individual would not be accepted if he/she were to have any other trade.

The next step

The next step is to submit documentary proof of successful completed unit standards on inspection, testing and certification of three phase industrial/commercial installations as prescribed by the ESETA.

These unit standards mean that an assessor, registered with the ESETA, must assess applicants to establish that they have the ability to interpret the codes of practice in various electrical installations. The applicants would also have to use test instruments and inspection reports to show the assessor that they know how to use the test instruments and interpret the readings. The applicants would also have to correctly evaluate a CoC against an electrical installation.

Once the assessor has found the applicant to be competent, the details are sent to the ESETA, who will then issue the applicant with a letter for the DoL.

“The minimum theoretical qualifications needed by a person applying for registration as an installation electrician is an N3 certificate issued by the department of education, with minimum pass of 40% in each of the following subjects: mathematics, engineering science, and electrical trade theory or electro-technology. Also acceptable is a Grade 12 certificate with a minimum pass of 40% in mathematics, science, and technical – electrical or an equivalent subject that may include an N3 subject.”

Finally, the applicant will have to submit proof of knowledge of the legislation and relevant health and safety standards applicable to electrical installations by having passed the subject, Installation Rules, as administered by the department of education through an FET campus or college.

There are two examinations for this subject and the applicant must have a minimum of 50% for each paper. Although both papers do not have to be written at the same time, the second paper must be passed within 12 months of passing the first. However, if the applicant obtained more than 75% of 100 marks in any one of the examinations, he or she will be permanently exempted from rewriting that examination.

Du Plessis finally emphasises that having a wireman’s license (Registration) means that the electrician carries a great deal of responsibility and should he/she issue a Certificate of Compliance but have not done what is expected by law, the department of labour will prosecute the electrician.

(Pic Credits: media.ngage)

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