Lake Turkana Wind Power Project
Featured image: Stock

Canadian-based RainMaker WorldWide has presented Morocco with a technology that can produce drinking water from wind energy. 

The company announced that it plans to install a pilot unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of its systems on the territory.

Explaining how this technology works; the company stated that the turbine blades of the wind turbine operate a compressor connected to a refrigeration system installed in the pylon. During this time, the air is sucked down through a fan that leads through this system, causing water condensation in the air.

Subsequently, the drops of water produced then flow along the walls and are stored in a tank ready for consumption.

According to Ecofin agency, the system, which can generate up to 20,000 litres of water a day, has already been tested in several countries, particularly in arid regions.

It is estimated that a single wind turbine would be sufficient to supply water to a village of 1,000 inhabitants. Read more: Morocco approves two hydropower plants

Harvesting water vapour from the air

The Canadian-based firm has filed a patent that improves the efficiency of harvesting water vapour from the air.

Rainmaker worked in concert with Netherlands-based research institution, Wetsus on the research and technology development.

The company's chief innovation officer Piet Oosterling said: “This is another step in our ongoing quest to improve water output while reducing the cost per litre of water in the places that need it the most.”

Wetsus Director Johannes Boonstra said: “We’re confident that this patent will play a critical role in the ongoing development of their technology.”

African Utility Week