energy plans
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We are creatures of habit. The first thing I do—while sipping my (usually second) cup of coffee—each morning is to scroll to the bottom of the ESI Africa website.

Originally published in the ESI Africa weekly newsletter on 29/04/2020

Why would I do this? To be treated to an insight into what you found interesting over the past 24 hours.

It’s also an excellent indicator for you to have a bird’s eye view on what’s trending.

There have been occasions where a story from the past week makes a reappearance in this section. Usually, the reason is due to the article having a link to a breaking news piece in some way.

Yesterday morning, one such story relates to how the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to affect the energy market. This topic, which I briefly covered in my Morning Coffee Video last week when the oil price plummeted, is on everyone’s mind as no industry is going to go untouched by the pandemic.

Based on a report by a research company, the trending article explains how the virus has resulted in a delay in Brazil’s energy plans for generation and transmission auctions, which had been scheduled for May 2020.

This means Brazil’s three-year energy plan has been disrupted, and the Ministry of Mines and Energy will have to rework the strategy.

It’s reinforced the notion of energy planning being a fluid strategy backed by steadfast policy to keep the initial approach in clear sight.

What is now needed is the habit of policymakers to work in cohesion – where energy, water, food and housing are not addressed in isolation.

An example of this is among today’s most-read stories, where research from the Rocky Mountain Institute shows how rural electrification efforts can unlock billions of dollars in new value across six agricultural processing or small business opportunities in Ethiopia.

This is the type of research that policymakers can use to direct a bright future for all.

Stay safe. Until next week.
Nicolette