Lamu coal power plant
Bucket of coal and helmet coal miner. Credit: 123rf

The construction of Kenya’s first coal power plant, Lamu coal power plant, is dividing government officials, whose views are different regarding its development.

According to Standard media, the environment Cabinet Secretary, Judi Wakhungu, has expressed that coal is dirty and that her ministry is opposed to the proposed plant in Lamu.

Wakhungu said the Lamu coal power plant would destroy the local environment and affect the health of the population.

‘There is no clean coal’

Wakhungu said: “The ministry of environment is quite clear that there is no clean coal; coal is dirty, there is nothing like clean coal.”

Wakhungu said although Kenya faces an electricity deficit and needs to invest more to step up production, there was consensus in government that coal power is dirty and hence not the solution to the country’s energy shortage, media reported.

This comes after President Uhuru Kenyatta led a delegation of investors to China to oversee the procurement of a $2 billion loan to fund the project. Read more…

Lamu coal power plant development

In May, energy cabinet secretary Charles Keter confirmed progress on the development of Lamu coal power station, which is being developed by Amu Power Company.

After signing the deal in China, Keter said: “The Lamu Power plant is one of the biggest plans under the public-private partnership framework. I am optimistic that the plant should be up and running in two years’ time.”

“If all goes well they can do their ground-breaking by June, July, this year,” he added.

Amid all of this development, the Kenya for Justice and Development Trust (KEJUDE) is also arguing that there is no demand for power produced by the project to justify a hefty investment. Read more…

Therefore, KEJUDE demanded government’s full disclosure on the dealings of Amu Power Company.

 

Featured image source: 123rf