Musanze hydropower plant
The regional Rusumo Falls Hydroelectric Project, a Nile Basin Initiative, is set to benefit three east African countries, namely Burundi, Rwanda and Tanzania.

Last week, two contracts, worth $75 million were concluded for the initial construction works to begin for the Regional Rusumo Falls Hydroelectric Project.

The New Times reported that the contracts were signed in Rwanda. The power project is expected to output 80MW of electricity.

The first contract was signed between Rusumo Power Company Limited (RPCL) and a consortium of contractors, including CGCOC Group Ltd – Jiangxi Water and Hydropower Construction Company Ltd Joint Venture (CGCOC – JWHC JV).

According to the media, the Nile Equatorial Lakes Subsidiary Action Programme Coordination Unit signed on behalf of Rusumo Power Company Limited.

Nile Equatorial Lakes Subsidiary Action Programme Coordination Unit regional coordinator, Elicad Elly Nyabeeya, expressed satisfaction with the progress on the project.

It is reported that the first contract provides for civil works, including supply and installation of hydro-mechanical equipment.

While the second contract, signed between Rusumo Power Company Limited and a consortium of companies, including German company Rusumo Falls Andritz Hydro GmbH and Indian company Andritz Hydro PVT Ltd, will carry out mechanical and electrical works for power generation.

Regional hydroelectric power project

The generated hydroelectric power will be shared equitably among Burundi, Rwanda and Tanzania.

The civil works at Rusumo site is expected to formally commence in January 2017, and go on for a period of three years, media reported.

On the other hand, construction works have been scheduled for late January.

The hydroelectric project is reported will be financed by the World Bank at a cost of $340 million.

The project’s transmission lines, that will connect the power plant to the national grids in the three countries, will be backed by the African Development Bank at a cost of $121 million.

The governments of Burundi, Rwanda and Tanzania are reported to have agreed to jointly develop the project and manage the hydroelectric power plant through Rusumo Power Company Ltd owned by the three countries.