Roundtable broadcast date: Wednesday, 19 May 2021

12h00 GMT | 13h00 London | 13h00 Lagos | 14h00 Johannesburg | 15h00 Nairobi 
Duration: 60 minutes 

The AfDB estimates the continent needs up to $170 billion to address its infrastructure needs, with an estimated financing gap of between $68 billion and $108 billion a year. Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are regarded as a way to narrow this gap by crowding in private sector investment into infrastructure development. 

PPPs have played a key role in the energy sector as they come in different shapes, sizes and the methodology used varies, depending on the place, the government and the specifics of the operation. Therefore each one is tailored to the needs and circumstances given at the time when the partnership is created. 

However, only five African countries account for more than half of all successful PPP activity between 2008 and 2018, namely South Africa, Morocco, Nigeria, Egypt and Ghana. Several other African countries are in the process of developing multiple PPPs, such as Burkina Faso with 20 in the pipeline and Botswana having eight.  

With a healthy stock of projects waiting in the wings, the timing is right to examine whether the PPP model is defunct or in need of a revamp? 

This roundtable will delve into:

  • The relevance of standard public private partnerships
  • Are concession, BOOTS, BOTs or DBOs more attractive?
  • The shape of a revitalised PPP
  • Can an existing PPP be nullified to take up a new model?
  • The potential risks of reinventing a PPP

Chairperson: David Baxter, Sustainable PPP and development consultant 

Expert Speakers

  • Fred Amonya, Infrastructure Policy Consultant (Excitation of PPP, 4IR and Climate), UK
  • Louise Mathu, Lead Consultant, Gennis Consulting, Kenya
  • Hoda Atia Moustafa, Head of the Sub-Saharan Africa Regional Office of the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA)