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Established to provide concessional buffer to needy economies on the continent, the African Development Fund (ADF), is not only facilitating rapid rollout of development projects, but its investments continue to transform and sustain lives, beneficiaries say.

In 38 of the continent’s neediest countries, the Fund is creating linkages to promote regional integration, commercial exchanges and enhancing food security by investing in power projects, roads and bridges, and other critical industrial and livelihood buildouts.

Zoom on transformative projects

  • Zambia’s Tezhi Hydro Power project, celebrated for providing clean and renewable electricity to nearly a million people.
  • In South West Madagascar, beneficiaries of a 107km road financed by the Fund said it has not only helped farmers to get their crops to market centre, but also saved lives of pregnant women and the sick by facilitating their timely arrival at health centre.

More about African Development Fund

ADF a strategic and trusted partner: impact in numbers

By the end of its current cycle, the ADF would have provided, since its inception, about $47.6 billion to strengthen fragile societies, in addition to building resilience and giving hope to the vulnerable.

Over the past three ADF cycles (2011 to 2018) the Bank has developed strong developmental impact in ADF countries:

  • 395MW of new generation capacity installed, including 170MW of renewable capacity, giving 10.9 million of people better access to electricity.
  • The ADF’s agriculture projects have benefited over 90 million people. 66.6 million people have better access to transport facilitating market access and international connection.
  • 2,307 kilometers of cross-border roads built or rehabilitated, and 4.1 million people provided with better access to education and 35.8 million people with access to water and sanitation.

Administered by the African Development Bank, the Fund comprises 32 contributing states and benefits 38 countries.

The ADF-eligible countries include those that are increasing their economic capacities and heading toward becoming the new emerging markets, as well as those that remain fragile and need special assistance for basic service delivery.