low-carbon

UK-based Johnnie Walker Scotch whisky producer Diageo has reported that it has successfully reduced its CO2 greenhouse gas emissions by 7.7% through direct operations.

This falls in line with its 2014 goal to actively reduce its environmental impact by 2020.

CO2 reduced through innovative projects

This reduction has been achieved through improving water efficiency by 12.5% compared to 2015; and having replenished 21% of total water used in final product in water-stressed areas through reforestation, desilting of dams, water storage and safe water and sanitation projects, the spirits business reported.

According to the beverage maker: “This year energy consumption from fuel, electricity, heating, cooling and steam reduced by 9.1% compared with 2015 as a result of energy efficiency gains and some impact from production patterns in the most energy intensive area of the business; malt and grain whisky distillation.”

Transport, driver of high emissions

The UK firm noted that outside of its day-to-day operations, transport and distribution of the packed products by third-party logistics providers and the use of chilling and refrigeration equipment by its retail customers to store and display, are amongst the most significant areas of energy consumption.

“Road and rail transport uses approximately 5.6 million gigajoules per year, and chilling and refrigeration equipment uses approximately 1.2 million gigajoules per year.”

“In 2016, the carbon emissions associated with distribution and logistics of finished product were fully aggregated and independently assured by the external provider, PwC. We now have comprehensive data, for a three-year period, on carbon emissions associated with distribution and logistics, to derive streamlining opportunities and improvement,” the firm added.

To address this concern, the firm is optimising logistics and distribution routes with key suppliers; increasing widespread use of technology wherever possible to minimise travel; and are promoting use of public transport, and cycle to work schemes.