gas pipeline
A gas pipeline network
cameroon
The inauguration of Altaaqa Global’s 50MW gas power plants at the Logbaba power plant in Douala, Cameroon

In Central Africa, global power service provider Altaaqa Global has successfully installed and commissioned two temporary natural gas power plants in Logbaba and Ndokoti (Bassa) within 21 days. With a joint capacity of 50MW, the power plants were recently inaugurated at the Logbaba power plant site in Douala, Cameroon.

The ceremony was attended by Dr Atangana Kouna Basile, Minister of Water Resources and Energy of Cameroon, members of the government and senior executives from the country’s national power company Eneo Cameroon S.A. and wholly owned subsidiary of Cameroon-based Victoria Oil & Gas (VOG), clean energy supplier Gaz du Cameroun (GDC).

Collaborative business model

Altaaqa global said in a statement that “the successful completion of the temporary gas power plants stands as a testament to the viability of a business model featuring a synergy among the government, the utility company, the fuel supplier and the equipment provider.”

The power provider added: “In this particular project, with the Cameroonian government and Eneo as clients, Altaaqa Global provided the power generation equipment, and took the responsibility of importing and installing the generators at the Logbaba and Ndokoti (Bassa) sites, while GDC supplied the gas to the rental gas power stations at both the sites.”

Peter den Boogert, CEO of Altaaqa Global commented: “The success of this project proves that through the synergy among entities that put service and integrity above themselves, anything can be achieved. Here, we have witnessed that the sum of all of us is greater than each of us.”

Kevin Foo CEO of VOG said: “[Through the agreement with Eneo] we have secured a major near-term user of gas for our Cameroon business and we are now becoming an active part of Cameroon’s energy equation.”

Eco-friendly technology

Altaaqa Global installed modern gas engine generators at both sites to ensure that the power plants operate efficiently whilst reducing the amount of emissions released.

According to Altaaqa Global, it has designed its gas generators to emit 250mg/ Nm3 to fit in with the worldwide emission requirements, which mandate the level of NOx emissions of equipment and industrial operations.

Strategic Accounts Director of Altaaqa Global, Majid Zahid said: “Our temporary gas power plant systems meet the worldwide emissions standards and do not harm the environment.”

He added: “As the generators run on natural gas, they do not require expensive after-treatments and are, therefore, more economical to operate owing to more cost-effective fuel prices.”

Climate change drives alternative solutions

The Central African country is heavily reliant on hydropower, which contributes an estimated 60% to the country’s total installed 1,400MW capacity.

Climate change, however, poses a huge risk so the country is being forced to seek alternative power sources.

In January this year, Cameroon welcomed its first renewable energy independent power producer, JCM Greenquest Solar Corporation, to develop a 72MW solar photovoltaic plant.

The grant was awarded by the Sustainable Energy Fund for Africa in 2014 which, according to the African Development Bank, will cover environmental and social assessments as well as technical, legal and financial advisory services.

This was followed by news that South African-based GSC Energy would begin the construction of a 500MW solar photovoltaic park in Q3 of 2015 in the northern region of Cameroon. The project is led by GSC Energy consortium including Austrian Sun Value, South African Tricom Structures and Conco.

The solar park is estimated to increase power generation by 50%, enough power to electrify an additional 50,000 homes and save 70,000 metric tonnes of CO2 a year.