Organic waste- Findpik
pic credit: Findpik

In East Africa, Kenya’s Uasin Gishu County, has teamed up with Swedish waste-to-energy firm, Againity, to develop a waste management system that will assist in the generation of 600kW of power, the Daily Nation reported.

Waste energy system capacity

The waste management company director, David Frykeras, said: “About 200 kilowatts will be powering up machines within the plant. Plans are underway to have the Kenyan Electricity Generating Company (KenGen) to absorb the rest of the power into the national grid.”

Speaking in Eldoret on Wednesday, Frykeras said: “We are projecting about 600 kilowatts of power from our plant. The projection is, of course, dependent on the volume of raw materials, so we believe we can hit the said target if we have a constant supply of material.”

Implementing waste management systems

According to the County Deputy Governor, Daniel Chemno, said: “The county is really looking forward to this partnership because we need such solutions.

“Our population is growing very fast and it is common sense that it comes with its challenges in matters of waste management.”

The Daily Nation reported that the County accumulates an estimated 200 tonnes of both organic and inorganic waste per day.

Growing demand

The regions overall demand for power is escalating and Kenya Power recorded that monthly rural electricity consumption in 2015 climbed to 45 million kWh from 39 million kWh the previous year.

[quote]That equates to an annual consumption of 520 million KWh, up from 474 million KWh in 2014, News Ghana reported last month.

According to News Ghana, the strengthened power system has seen a rise in new customers of around 1.04 million, increasing the number of households with access to electricity to over 3.3 million— a 46% growth in just over a year.