On Monday, South Africa’s state-owned power utility, Eskom, announced that it has successfully installed 1.3 million energy efficient light bulbs in the past six months.

This initiative forms part of the utility’s Energy Efficient Lighting Exchange Programme, a door-to-door campaign that involves the exchange of old-style light bulbs and non-working compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with new CFLs.

The installations have been implemented in residential homes in four provinces since November 2015 (figures are up until 11 May 2016):

  • Kwa-Zulu Natal – 1,008,692
  • Western Cape – 238,029
  • Eastern Cape – 95,358
  • Free State – 45,358

Energy efficient bulbs to be verified

Eskom explained in a company statement: “Auditors will do random visits to some homes to verify the installation of lamps. Homeowners are cautioned to be vigilant and to check the identity of the person who says they are an Eskom represented auditor.

“The auditors should have plastic branded bibs that say “Free Energy Efficient Lighting Exchange” with Eskom branded photo identity cards.”

This programme is one of Eskom’s key initiatives to keep the power supply stable.

Out of the over two million lamps installed to date over 1.3-million has been independently verified and achieved evening peak demand savings of 67MW, enough to provide over 80% of the power needed to power a town the size of Mthatha in the Eastern Cape or Emnambithi in KwaZulu-Natal, the utility said in a statement.

The first phase of the roll-out involves the installation of 4.8-million CFLs and a further 5.2-million will be installed in all nine provinces by end March 2018.

With the efficient use of energy a global priority, the programme will continue to play a crucial role in helping homeowners to reduce their monthly electricity bills while keeping South Africa’s power supply stable.