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The board of the Green Climate Fund (GCF) has approved funding for three proposals from the African Development Bank totaling over $110 million.

The approvals were granted at the recent GCF’s 21st Board Meeting, held in Manama, Bahrain.

Overall, the GCF Board considered 20 funding proposals requesting approximately $1.2 billion. Read more: DBSA secure funds to establish Climate Finance Facility

The board approved $67.8 million for the Programme for Integrated Development and Adaptation to Climate Change in the Niger Basin (PIDACC/NB), which will benefit from GCF funds comprising $57.8 million grant, and a $10 million concessional loan.

The programme is further resourced by co-financing from the AfDB, the European Union, the Global Environmental Facility, the Forestry Investment Programme of the Climate Investment Funds, and the beneficiary countries, for an estimated $147 million. This brings the total programme resources to $214.8 million.

Climate change adaptation

PIDACC will help preserve basin ecosystems and biodiversity, particularly by:

  • Reducing the Niger River silting process;
  • Improving the adaptability of populations to climate change;
  • Strengthening the resilience of production systems for 4 million direct beneficiaries, and 10 million indirect beneficiaries in the nine Niger Basin countries;
  • It will also contribute to reducing about 7 million tCO2eq emissions over the project lifespan.

“The multi-national approach to climate change adaptation by PIDACC offers an opportunity for the African Development Bank-GCF partnership to promote low-emission, climate-resilient agriculture in the nine Niger basin countries” said Martin Fregene, director for the department of agriculture and agro-industry at the Bank.

Green mini-grids

The Democratic Republic of Congo Green Mini-Grid also received approval for a $20 million senior loan, and $1 million grant.

The bank will match the approved amounts and instruments, resulting in a total of $40 million senior loan, and $2 million grant.

The loan will finance three pilot solar PV plants and battery storage -with the shortfall financed by project sponsors’ equity and quasi-equity- and the grant will finance complementary technical assistance to ensure that green mini-grids are scaled-up across the country beyond the pilot phase.

The mini-grids are envisaged will provide access to clean, reliable and more affordable energy to approximately 150,000 people who live off-grid.

This will contribute to reducing emissions of 560,000 tCO2eq over the 20-year lifespan of the project.

The third project, the Yeleen Rural Electrification Project in Burkina Faso valued at about $62 million, received approval for $28.3 million, with co-financing from the Bank, EU and private sector sponsors to cover the rest of the project costs.

The project will provide electricity access to 335,000 people with an estimated annual consumption of 15 GWh, and create between 200 and 700 permanent jobs in the mini-grid market.

It will also contribute to an estimated reduction in GHG emissions of about 390,000 tCO2eq over the 25-year lifespan of the project.

Ousseynou Nakoulima, Director of the renewable energy department at the AfDB said, “We are pleased to partner with the GCF to unlock the first wave of green mini-grid deployment in the DRC and Burkina Faso and to accelerate access to a clean energy system. With innovative business models, these projects will set the stage for scaling up and replication throughout Africa.”